Heritage Apple Descriptions

 

The Open Orchard Project has saved hundreds of heritage apples to pass on to future generations. Over the next few weeks Robyn will post up the first batches she has manually identified over the last few years and then add to them over time as she finds a match.  We are hoping to get the interesting but 'tricky to identify' apples DNA tested in the future which will speed the process up. We estimate we will have over 400 varieties saved from the 1,400 varieties sold in NZ to the European settlers of Southern NZ in 1860-1910.

 

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Adams Pearmain

From Herefordshire, England 1830.  They are tall pear-shaped apples that have a lovely nutty flavour and can be grown in wet areas without getting fungal black spot. Half the apple tends to be green and the other half red.

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Brownlees Russet

These apples covered in russet are not affected by hail or birds, so they are a great, trouble-free fruit. From Hertfordshire 1848. Ready to pick in April. They are very dense so they are great cut up for a cheese board.

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Egremont Russet

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Stirling Castle

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Autumn Pearmain

This is one of the oldest English eating apples, dated from around 1500's.  Ready to eat in late March. It has lots of russeting in the skin but the browny red colour shines through.

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Claygate Pearmain

These are from Claygate, Surrey before 1822 and are esteemed as a first rate dessert (eating) apple.  More uniform in colour and very light russeting.  

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Keswick Codlin

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Warners King

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Belle de Boskoop

This is the cooking apple cherished by those from the Netherlands. It was brought to England in 1897. It is a solid disease-resistant tree with dry, russeted and highly coloured  skin. Good for cider and cooking when it is fresh but after 4-5 months it is sweet to eat.

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Cornish Longkeeper

This is the one apple that my grandchildren can eat in December. For the first 6 months it a cooker, then you can eat it, like the Belle de Boskoop.  It is heavy and shiny, mainly green with a red blush. It's  distinguishing feature is the red colour radiating from the stalk.

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Reinette de Canada

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Worchester Pearmain

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